My Coffee Black and My Tea in the Harbor Ultra-Thin Vintage T-Shirt

$30.00

In 1773, Parliament and King George passed the Tea Act, an act that levied a tax on all tea that entered into the colonies. In short order, the Sons of Liberty organized and prepared to repel incoming ships carrying tea. They had been successful in the past when the British attempted similar measures with the Stamp Act, and in every colony but Massachusetts, and specifically Boston, they were successful again, as all British ships were unable to unload their cargo. In Boston, however, Governor Hutchinson, who had significant ties to the tea industry, refused to bow to colonial protests and several tea vessels, including the Dartmouth, arrived in Boston Harbor. Following a Sons of Liberty meeting in Faneuil Hall led by Sam Adams, the colonists boarded the ships and dumped all 342 chests of tea into the water in protest for taxation without representation - what they perceived as tyranny. This protest directly contributed to the American Revolution and was a rallying cry for Gandhi against the British. For many people today, The Boston Tea Party still stands as an example for all free people that we must hold our governments to task - that we are only free so long as we are willing to fight for that freedom and remain vigilant against those who believe they are better equiped to make our decisions for us. In the words of Ronald Reagan: Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free. Ranger Up would like to honor those troops and veterans who have fought for our freedom, as well as those patriots that ensure that our government officials are never allowed to conspire to remove our freedoms in the name of the common good.

Full Description

In 1773, Parliament and King George passed the Tea Act, an act that levied a tax on all tea that entered into the colonies. In short order, the Sons of Liberty organized and prepared to repel incoming ships carrying tea. They had been successful in the past when the British attempted similar measures with the Stamp Act, and in every colony but Massachusetts, and specifically Boston, they were successful again, as all British ships were unable to unload their cargo. In Boston, however, Governor Hutchinson, who had significant ties to the tea industry, refused to bow to colonial protests and several tea vessels, including the Dartmouth, arrived in Boston Harbor. Following a Sons of Liberty meeting in Faneuil Hall led by Sam Adams, the colonists boarded the ships and dumped all 342 chests of tea into the water in protest for taxation without representation - what they perceived as tyranny. This protest directly contributed to the American Revolution and was a rallying cry for Gandhi against the British. For many people today, The Boston Tea Party still stands as an example for all free people that we must hold our governments to task - that we are only free so long as we are willing to fight for that freedom and remain vigilant against those who believe they are better equiped to make our decisions for us. In the words of Ronald Reagan: Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free. Ranger Up would like to honor those troops and veterans who have fought for our freedom, as well as those patriots that ensure that our government officials are never allowed to conspire to remove our freedoms in the name of the common good.

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SKU: RU1036

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